Bobby Jones (Golfer)

I always loved the movie, The Legend of Bagger Vance it is a 2000 American sports drama film directed by Robert Redford, and stars Will Smith, Matt Damon and Charlize Theron.  It is based on the 1995 book The Legend of Bagger Vance: A Novel of Golf and the Game of Life.  It is a story of a young golfer in Savannah, Ga. that is in a golf tournament with Bobby Jones and Walter Hagen.  The match ended in a 3 way tie.  If you haven’t seen the movie I think you would enjoy it very much.

Here is some information about Bobby Jones.

Robert Tyre “Bobby” Jones Jr.

March 17, 1902 – December 18, 1971) was an American amateur golfer, and a lawyer by profession, who was one of the most influential figures in the history of the sport. Jones founded and helped design the Augusta National Golf Club, and co-founded the Masters Tournament. The innovations that he introduced at the Masters have been copied by virtually every professional golf tournament in the world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tJones was the most successful amateur golfer ever to compete at a national and international level. During his peak from 1923 to 1930, he dominated top-level amateur competition, and competed very successfully against the world’s best professional golfers.

Jones often beat stars such as Walter Hagen and Gene Sarazen, the era’s top pros. Jones earned his living mainly as a lawyer, and competed in golf only as an amateur, primarily on a part-time basis, and chose to retire from competition at age 28, though he earned significant money from golf after that, as an instructor and equipment designer.

Explaining his decision to retire, Jones said, “It [championship golf] is something like a cage. First you are expected to get into it and then you are expected to stay there. But of course, nobody can stay there.”  Jones is most famous for his unique “Grand Slam,” consisting of his victory in all four major golf tournaments of his era (the open and amateur championships in both the U.S. & the U.K.) in a single calendar year (1930). In all Jones played in 31 majors, winning 13 and placing among the top ten finishers 27 times.

After retiring from competitive golf in 1930, Jones founded and helped design the Augusta National Golf Club soon afterwards in 1933. He also co-founded the Masters Tournament, which has been annually staged by the club since 1934 (except for 1943–45, when it was canceled due to World War II). The Masters evolved into one of golf’s four major championships. Jones came out of retirement in 1934 to play in the Masters on an exhibition basis through 1948. Jones played his last round of golf at East Lake Golf Club, his home course in Atlanta, on August 18, 1948. A picture commemorating the event now sits in the clubhouse at East Lake. Citing health reasons, he quit golf permanently thereafter.

Bobby Jones was often confused with the prolific golf course designer, Robert Trent Jones, with whom he worked from time to time. “People always used to get them confused, so when they met, they decided each be called something different,” Robert Trent Jones Jr. said. To help avoid confusion, the golfer was called “Bobby,” and the golf course designer was called “Trent.”

1930: Grand Slam
Jones is the only player ever to have won the (pre-Masters) Grand Slam, or all four major championships, in the same calendar year (1930). Jones’ path to the 1930 Grand Slam title was:
The Amateur Championship, Old Course at St Andrews, Scotland
The Open Championship, Royal Liverpool Golf Club, Hoylake, England
U.S. Open, Interlachen Country Club, Minnesota
U.S. Amateur, Merion Golf Club, Pennsylvania

Jones made a bet on himself achieving this extraordinary feat with British bookmakers early in 1930, before the first tournament of the Slam, at odds of 50–1, and collected over $60,000 when he did it.

Jones represented the United States in the Walker Cup five times, winning nine of his 10 matches, and the U.S. won the trophy all five times. He served as playing captain of the U.S. team in 1928 and 1930. He also won two other tournaments against professionals: the 1927 Southern Open and the 1930 Southeastern Open. Jones was a lifelong member of the Atlanta Athletic Club (at the club’s original site, now the East Lake Golf Club), and the Capital City Club in Atlanta.

Jones is considered one of the five giants of the 1920s American sports scene, along with baseball’s Babe Ruth, boxing’s Jack Dempsey, football’s Red Grange, and tennis player Bill Tilden.   He was the first recipient of the AAU’s Sullivan Award as the top amateur athlete in the United States. He is the only sports figure to receive two ticker-tape parades in New York City, the first in 1926 and the second in 1930. Jones is memorialized in Augusta, Georgia, at the Golf Gardens and has the Bobby Jones Expressway, also known as Interstate 520, named for him.

Jones’s four titles in the U.S. Open remain tied for the most ever in that championship, along with Willie Anderson, Ben Hogan, and Jack Nicklaus. His four second-place finishes in the U.S. Open place him second all-time with Sam Snead and Nicklaus. Phil Mickelson holds the dubious record with six (1999, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2009, 2013) second-place finishes. His five titles in the U.S. Amateur are a record. Jones was ranked as the fourth greatest golfer of all time by Golf Digest magazine in 2000. Nicklaus was first, Hogan second, and Snead third.

Jones was ranked as the third greatest golfer of all time in a major survey published by Golf Magazine, September 2009. Nicklaus was ranked first, with Tiger Woods second, Hogan fourth, and Snead fifth.

I thought that you would enjoy some history about Bobby Jones one of the Greatest Golfers in American History.

Tell me what you think below,

Bobby

 

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